Nursing

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Registered Nursing is among the Top Ten Occupations with the Largest Job Growth. Nurses promote health, prevent disease, and help patients cope with illness. They have a unique scope of practice and can practice independently, although they also collaborate with all members of the healthcare team to provide the care needed by each patient as an individual.

Nurses are hands-on health professionals who provide focused and highly personalized care. The field has a wide range of career opportunities, ranging from entry-level practitioner to doctoral-level researcher. Nurses also serve as advocates for patients, families, and communities. They develop and manage nursing care plans; instruct patients and their families in proper care; and help individuals and groups take steps to improve or maintain their health.

As you review your options, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Pre-nursing is not a degree-granting program, so you cannot major in pre-nursing.
  • Individual advising is strongly recommended.
  • Pre-nursing students take pre-requirement course work in preparation to transfer to a school that offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or Accelerated BSN. However, it is possible for students to stay at K-State for three years, or graduate from K-State and then transfer.
Curriculum (pdf)
Advisor: Sherryl Allen

 

Email: sherryl@k-state.edu
Phone: 532-6900
Office: 113 Eisenhower Hall

Eligibility Criteria & Application Information 

Academic Requirements

Although an entry-level nurse can find a job with a three-year RN (Registered Nurse) degree, there is a growing national movement to require all nurses to hold a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing. An increasing number of nursing schools are offering accelerated bachelor and master degree programs. There also are a growing number of RN-to-MSN and MSN-to-doctoral programs, designed to meet the increasing demand for more highly skilled nurses in the workforce.

On the average it can take up to four years to complete Nursing pre-requirements and a BSN program.

Once you are a professional nurse will need to take the nursing licensure exam called the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). There are two types of NCLEX; NCLEX-RN for registered nurses and the NCLEX- PN for vocational or practical nurses.

You might choose to focus on a particular specialty. There are numerous specialty options -- each of which has its own education/certification requirements and related professional network or organization.

For more information on careers in this field, visit the Explore Health Careers web site.

Admissions

Students complete about 65 credit hours of pre-required college coursework before they can apply and transfer to nursing school of their choice. The minimum GPA and minimum course grade vary among nursing programs. Students should visit the web site(s) in order to explore the pre-requirements and transfer equivalents for the nursing programs.

Application Process

The application process and deadlines vary considerably and prospective students are strongly encouraged to review the nursing school website and make contact with an admissions representative.

Most nursing programs use an online application or the Nursing Centralized Application System (NCAS). NCAS allows applicants to complete one online application and designate multiple programs to receive it. NCAS verifies the materials for authenticity.

Some nursing programs require an application to the nursing school as well as an application to the College or University. Most require letters of reference as well.

In addition, many nursing schools now require the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS), or the Nurse Entrance Test (NET) as part of their application process. Both of these exams measure entry level skills and base knowledge in reading, math, science, and English. The exams serve two purposes. First, they assess entry level skills and abilities of nursing school applicants. Second, they serve as a means of standardized students. Programs receive applications from across the country, from students who attend both large and small universities; liberal arts colleges, community colleges in rural counties or large urban communities. Nursing schools may also use the TEAS and NET scores as a way to predict success in passing the NCLEX.

Relevant Tests

Many nursing schools now require the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS), or the Nurse Entrance Test (NET) as part of their application process. Both of these exams measure entry level skills and base knowledge in reading, math, science, and English. The exams serve two purposes.

  • First, they assess entry level skills and abilities of nursing school applicants.
  • Second, they serve as a means of standardized students.

Programs receive applications from across the country, from students who attend both large and small universities; liberal arts colleges, community colleges in rural counties or large urban communities. Nursing schools may also use the TEAS and NET scores as a way to predict success in passing the NCLEX.

Once you are a professional nurse will need to take the nursing licensure exam called the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). There are two types of NCLEX; NCLEX-RN for registered nurses and the NCLEX- PN for vocational or practical nurses. 

Relevant Links