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College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Louise Benjamin

Dr. Louise BenjaminAssociate Dean for Academic Affairs

Emaillouben@k-state.edu
Office: Calvin 110
Phone: (785) 532-6900

Dr. Benjamin was named the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Arts & Sciences in December of 2013, moving from the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communications where she held the Ross Beach Chair in Mass Communications.

In her role as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Benjamin's responsibilities include curriculum planning and development, academic review for the college, summer school coordination, budget planning and interfacing with K-State's Division of Continuing Education. Benjamin also works with the dean on reappointments and evaluation of department heads, is involved with academic promotion and tenure for faculty, handles faculty Affirmative Action issues, coordinates faculty and alumni awards, and works with the KSU Foundation as an active fund raiser.

Benjamin joined the faculty at Kansas State in 2008 and served as the interim director of the Miller School in the 2012-2013 academic year. Before coming to K-State, she taught at Indiana University and the University of Georgia. While at the University of Georgia, she served as the associate director and interim director of the George Foster Peabody Awards. She has held leadership roles in several academic communication associations, including the Association for Journalism and Mass Communication, the International Communication Association, the National Communication Association and the Broadcast Education Association. Before entering academe, she was a director/producer for WHO-TV in Des Moines, Iowa.

Benjamin received her Ph.D. in mass communications from the University of Iowa in December 1985 and has published two books and numerous articles on the history of electronic media. Her book, Freedom of the Air and the Public Interest: First Amendment Rights in Broadcasting to 1935, received the Franklyn Haiman Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Freedom of Expression from the National Communication Association.